Spousal Support and Alimony

Experienced Alimony Lawyer

No matter your reason for divorce, one of the most contentious issues that arise in any divorce is the subject of alimony.

During the dissolution of a marriage people often consult with a lawyer regarding alimony. Spousal support, also know as alimony is often a critical component of divorce necessary to allow one spouse to move forward with their life. Under Massachusetts law a court may order alimony to a spouse of a long term marriage upon considering all relevant factors.

Spousal Support And Alimony

Alimony payments—also known in some states as “spousal support” or “maintenance” is the legal obligation that a supporting spouse pay to the supported spouse. Massachusetts courts generally award alimony to the lower-earning spouse so that spouse can maintain a reasonable standard of living during and after divorce.

In the commonwealth of Massachusetts, several types of alimony can be awarded. They are called rehabilitative, reimbursement, transitional, and general alimony.

When a spouse is in need of additional education or job training to become financially independent, rehabilitative alimony can be awarded for up to five years.

Reimbursement alimony may be ordered as compensation to a spouse who financially supported the family while completing an education or job training during the marriage.

For short-term marriages, those lasting less than five years, the court may award transitional alimony to help the recipient spouse adjust to a new lifestyle or location.

General alimony may be ordered by the court, depending on the length of your marriage.

How is Alimony Determined in Massachusetts?

The important thing to know is that in determining any such alimony award a judge is going to consider all aspects and contributions of the marriage as a whole. A decision that alimony is warranted can be either temporary or permanent.

The length of the marriage is a significant factor when determining the amount of alimony one can expect to receive. “According to the Massachusetts Alimony Calculator, under the current Massachusetts law if the marriage lasts five years or fewer the max alimony can only equal to 50%, 60% if married ten years or fewer but more than a total of five years, 70% if married fifteen years or fewer but more than a total of ten years, and 80% if twenty years or fewer but more than a total of fifteen years. If the marriage lasts longer than twenty years, it is at the judge’s discretion to determine the length and how much the spouse receives.”

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We have helped our clients with alimony issues on both sides of the coin. Attorney Cote offers a free case evaluation to better understand your situation and address some of your initial questions and concerns. Call to speak with us to protect your rights and learn you options.

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